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Norway: #OilFreeLofoten
 
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Thirty years ago, this ecosystem almost collapsed from overfishing. Today, it’s one of the richest marine habitats in the world, with a huge sustainable fishery and tourism industry, and massive cetacean populations. There’s no other place in the world like it. But this region is at risk again - this time from petroleum development. The oil industry has vied for a stake in these Arctic waters for twenty years. But they have met resistance at every turn, and the Lofoten Islands have remained protected under temporary bans on petroleum activity since 2001. SeaLegacy stood with Norway in 2017 to support the latest temporary ban. Now, alongside our partners at Folkeaksjonen, we are urging the Norwegian Labour Party to establish permanent protection for this region and support an #OilFreeLofoten today. This is Norway's chance to stand on the right side of history and become a shining beacon of hope for the world. Learn more: http://bit.ly/yt-1-oil-free-lofoten Video by: Paul Nicklen, Andy Maser, Göran Ehlmé, Nathan Garofalos, Frederik Teglhus, Kyle Roepke, Ryan Fagan, Chelsie Xavier-Blower, Anders Drud Jordan, Lars Öivind Knutsen, Martin Ministi // Music by: Serge Côté // Soundtrack by: Jordy Bell // Special thanks to: Cristina Mittermeier, Hanne Strager, Ingrid Skjoldvær, Ina Libak, Silje Ask Lundberg // With footage from: Natural History Museum of Denmark
Views: 4964 SeaLegacy
Tweed Salmon and Ocean Ecology
 
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Jens Christian Holst gave this talk at a seminar held by the Tweed Foundation in Kelso on 14th December 2016. It examines the management of marine ecosystems and why they should be an integral part of Atlantic Salmon stock management. He postulates that the large pelagic fish stocks in the NE Atlantic has led to overgrazing of the plankton resources with grave effects to all levels of the ecosystem and particularly with the long term trends in European salmon stocks. The continued low abundance of salmon stocks in many parts of the North Atlantic, despite significant fishery reductions, strengthens the view that factors acting on survival in the first and second years at sea are constraining the abundance of Atlantic salmon. Jens Christian is a former senior scientist at the Institute of Marine Research, Bergen, Norway. His specialised working areas are research related to the the pelagic fish resources in the Norwegian Sea, in particular herring and salmon, but also blue whiting and mackerel. Recently his focus has been ecosystem dynamics and management of the pelagic resources. He has been the chairman of the International council for Exploration of the Sea's Planning Group on Surveys on Pelagic Fish in the Norwegian Sea and was advisor for the Norwegian authorities in international fisheries negotiations. This presentation was recorded with amateur recording equipment and so the sound quality is very poor. However the content of the presentation is very important and crucial to understanding what is happening to Tweed Salmon stocks.
Views: 1047 tweedfoundation
Horrible and wonderful creatures of the deep: Feeding Hagfish in Norway
 
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Celebrate the Ugly! More pics and videos on my website: www.uli-kunz.com and on Instagram: @uli_kunz In ge­ne­ral, peop­le love ani­mals with big eyes, soft fur, be­au­ti­ful fea­thers or fri­end­ly be­ha­viour. But an eco­sys­tem needs ever­y­thing! Even or­ga­nis­ms as un­attrac­tive as the hag­fish. These ra­ther gross, pink sau­sa­ges are the slimy sca­ven­gers of the deep. With as­to­nis­hing ca­pa­bi­li­ties: They can trans­form a bu­cket of water into a gooey slime wi­t­hin se­conds, they most­ly feed on dead ani­mals which they enter via mouth, gills, eyes or other un­spea­ka­ble openings and have a face that only a mo­ther can love. They can tie them­sel­ves in a knot, can sur­vi­ve months wi­thout fee­ding and fend off even much lar­ger pre­da­tors by the use of their slime, clog­ging the gills of an at­ta­cker. In 2009, the "In­ter­na­tio­nal Hag­fish Day" (ce­le­bra­ted an­nu­al­ly on the third Wed­nes­day in Oc­to­ber) was pro­mo­ted for the first time, "en­cou­ra­ging child­ren to look at ever­y­bo­dy in the food web, even mem­bers as un­attrac­tive as the hag­fish". Let's ce­le­bra­te this fa­sci­na­ting crea­tu­re! By the way, I met some of those cuddly toys in a Nor­we­gi­an Fjord. It is up to you to watch this video. Don't tell me that I did not warn you...
Views: 1324680 Uli Kunz
A Call On The Norwegian Government
 
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https://www.savethearctic.org/en/protectwhatyoulove/ Writer / ecologist Carl Safina travels to Svalbard with Greenpeace to witness the impact of bottom trawling fisheries on the Arctic ecosystem. He's calling on the Norwegian Government to join recent positive developments in the seafood industry and protect unaffected areas from bottom trawling.
🌏 Farming underwater: 3D solutions for land and sea | Earthrise
 
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Food production is facing challenges that require new, more creative and sustainable solutions. Companies involved in various segments of the industry, including agriculture and fishing, are looking at revolutionising the current systems, which have left bodies of water overfished and land in terrible condition. On Long Island in New York, locals are tackling overfishing by using a new system that brings industries together. Fishermen and scientists have collaborated to realise and improve 3D farming. 3D ocean farming is a system that grows a mix of seaweed crops and shellfish - including mussels and oysters - under the water's surface. This polyculture vertical farming system requires zero input because the sea plants filter and sequester carbon, making it, at this moment, the most sustainable means of food production on the planet. "Imagine an underwater garden where you’re using the entire water column which means we have very small footprints," tells ocean farmer Bren Smith. Additionally, this system also sequesters carbon and rebuilds the reef's ecosystem. The crops and shellfish grown underwater can be used as food, fertiliser, animal feed and even energy. In this way, climate change can be tackled while producing food, i.e. the food itself is the water filter. "[mussels are] really lean proteins packed full of omega 3s, but also soak up and use nitrogen to grow... this farm filters millions of gallons of water a week and oysters filter up to 50 gallons a day," Smith says. "We have to tell a story, a helpful story about the future. You know, it's all bad news about climate change and food security. I think out here we can say our oceans are a blank slate and we really have a chance to really build something new, and build something from the bottom up that's sustainable and restorative and doesn't make all the mistakes of industrial agriculture or aquaculture," Smith explains.
Views: 14370 Al Jazeera English
Plastic trash from Americas and Europe fill the Arctic ecosystem
 
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The average American throws away an estimated 185 pounds of plastic each year. Scientists say a third of our plastic trash ends up in a fragile ecosystem like the ocean. Jonathan Vigliotti traced our plastic trash to the Arctic islands in northern Norway. Subscribe to the "CBS This Morning" Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/1Q0v2hE Watch "CBS This Morning" HERE: http://bit.ly/1T88yAR Watch the latest installment of "Note to Self," only on "CBS This Morning," HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1Sh8XlB Follow "CBS This Morning" on Instagram HERE: http://bit.ly/1Q7NGnY Like "CBS This Morning" on Facebook HERE: http://on.fb.me/1LhtdvI Follow "CBS This Morning" on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1Xj5W3p Follow "CBS This Morning" on Google+ HERE: http://bit.ly/1SIM4I8 Get the latest news and best in original reporting from CBS News delivered to your inbox. Subscribe to newsletters HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1RqHw7T Get your news on the go! Download CBS News mobile apps HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1Xb1WC8 Get new episodes of shows you love across devices the next day, stream local news live, and watch full seasons of CBS fan favorites anytime, anywhere with CBS All Access. Try it free! http://bit.ly/1OQA29B --- Delivered by Charlie Rose, Norah O’Donnell and Gayle King, "CBS This Morning" offers a thoughtful, substantive and insightful source of news and information to a daily audience of 3 million viewers. The Emmy Award-winning broadcast presents a mix of daily news, coverage of developing stories of national and global significance, and interviews with leading figures in politics, business and entertainment. Check local listings for "CBS This Morning" broadcast times.
Views: 2752 CBS This Morning
DigitalLife 2018 Ida Helene Steen UiB
 
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Biodiscovery and bioprospecting of Norwegian deep-sea hydrothermal vent systems Norway controls large ocean areas where the genetic and functional diversity of microorganisms is poorly investigated. Through interdisciplinary work using deep-marine technology, geochemistry, microscopy, microbiology, bioinformatics, we explore the microbial life in deep-sea hydrothermal vent systems located on the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR). Functional and metabolic adaptations of different genera of Epsilonproteobacteria associated with low-temperature and high-temperature venting sites within the Loki´s Castle located at 2300 meters depth, have been identified. Moreover, using cultivation and genomics, we have identified a broad use of complex carbohydrates and protein-based compounds by heterotrophs grown either as single organism or in co-cultures. A major result of our knowledge on the geomicrobiology of the AMOR vent fields is an increasing interest from different industries. Genetic resources from AMOR are currently being explored as a starting point for Green and Blue value chains. In our work with industry we have developed chambers for enrichment of microorganism tailored to the degradation of relevant industrial substrates as well as equipment for harvesting of large volumes of fluids for sequencing of viromes. Finally, using metagnomics on diverse samples form the AMOR vent fields we have built a VentZyme database comprising of more than 4 million ORFs. Altogether our result may provide valuable knowledge about how we assess our deep sea hydrothermal vent ecosystem as a potential marine resource for biotechnology.
R/V Helmer Hanssen, IMR Ecosystem Survey of the Barents Sea
 
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As part of the course 'Ecosystem-based Management of Arctic Marine Systems' delivered by UNIS (University Centre in Svalbard) I've been part of the annual IMR Joint Norwegian/Russian Ecosystem survey covering the whole Barents Sea. This part of the survey was done on board R/V Helmer Hanssen (NO) in the periode (24/09/16-04/10/16). Enjoy the video, share and give a comment if you like! The video is just made for fun and IMR can not be held responsible for this video! Thank you, Mads Korfitz Mortensen!
Take a Virtual Dive in a Kelp Forest | California Academy of Sciences
 
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Visit an underwater forest near Point Lobos, California, to learn what a kelp forest food web looks like. From the smallest microbes to the largest animals, more than a thousand species take part in this diverse food web that draws its energy from the Sun. Data Sources: Animated Species Reference: San Francisco Bay Food Web Ecological Model of Paleocommunity Food Webs, G. Diel and K. Flessa, EDS. Conservation Paleobiology: The Paleontological Society Papers, 15: 195-220. Peter Roopnarine, Curator, Invertebrate Zoology & Geology, California Academy of Sciences. Collections of the California Academy of Sciences Moe Flannery, Collection Manager, Ornithology & Mammalogy, Christina Piotrowski, Collection Manager, Invertebrate Zoology & Geology, Debra Trock, Senior Collections Manager, Botany. The Steinhart Aquarium Staff Bart Shepherd, Director. M. Elliott Jessup, Diving Safety Officer. Margarita Upton, Aquatic Biologist For classroom activities, visit www.calacademy.org/educators/habitat-earth-in-the-classroom - - - The California Academy of Sciences is a renowned scientific and educational institution dedicated to exploring, explaining, and sustaining life on Earth. Based in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park, it's the only place in the world to house an aquarium, planetarium, rainforest, and natural history museum—plus cutting-edge research programs—all under one living roof. Connect with us: • Facebook: https://facebook.com/calacademy • Twitter: https://twitter.com/calacademy • Instagram: https://instagram.com/calacademy • Snapchat: https://www.snapchat.com/add/heycalacademy • Tumblr: https://heycalacademy.tumblr.com
The Call of the Mountain ~ Arne Naess and the Deep Ecology Movement (full version)
 
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The Call of the Mountain: Arne Naess and the Deep Ecology Movement : Director: Jan van Boeckel | Producer: Karin van der Molen/Pat van Boeckel Genre: Documentary | Produced In: 1997 | Story Teller's Country: Netherlands Tags: Ecology, Environment, Global, Spiritual Awareness ~ Transcript of the film The full transcript of the interview with philosopher Arne Naess, that was made for the documentary film The Call of the Mountain is available here: http://www.naturearteducation.org/R/Interviews/Naess1.htm Interview: Jan van Boeckel © ReRun Producties, 1997 Blokzijlerdijk 4, 8373 EK Blankenham, The Netherlands E-mail: welcome(at)rerunproducties.nl www.rerunproducties.nl ~ Synopsis: On 1500 metres above sea level, on the slope of the mountain Hallingskarvet, stands "Tvergastein', the cabin of Norwegian philosopher Arne Naess. In his life he has spent nearly 12 years in this hut, where he wrote several books and essays on philosophy and ecology. In this film, Naess tells about the concept of 'deep ecology', which was first introduced by him in 1973. One of the basic tenets of deep ecology is that nature has a value in itself, apart from its possible use value to humans. Next to being a famous mountaineer, Naess has been a longtime activist in the environmental movement. He gives an inspiring account of his participation in blockades to prevent the Alta river in northern Norway (the area of the Sami, an indigenous people) from being dammed. With contributions by Helena Norberg-Hodge, Vandana Shiva, Bill Devall, George Sessions and Harold Glasser. Request DVD: You may purchase the DVD of this film directly from this StoryTeller/Producer. Please visit: http://www.rerunproducties.nl/ Or contribute: http://www.cultureunplugged.com/documentary/watch-online/play/11828/The-Call-of-the-Mountain--Arne-Naess-and-the-Deep-Ecology-Movement ~ Arne Næss (27 January 1912 – 12 January 2009) was a Norwegian philosopher who coined the term deep ecology and was an important intellectual and inspirational figure within the environmental movement of the late twentieth century. In 1939, Næss was the youngest person to be appointed full professor at the University of Oslo and the only professor of philosophy in the country at the time. He was a noted mountaineer, who in 1950 led the expedition that made the first ascent of Tirich Mir(7,708 m). The Tvergastein hut in the Hallingskarvet massif played an important role in Ecosophy T, as "T" is said to represent his mountain hut Tvergastein. More: Arne Næss (Google+): https://plus.google.com/u/0/112673322472884421570/posts ~ This video is a copy from "rerunproducties", DailyMotion: http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x8meah_arne-naess_creation ~
Oil rig filmed with drone in Norway
 
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Oil rig on its way to dock in Tromsø, Norway
Views: 4047 vegasti
Norwegian Sea | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Norwegian Sea Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= The Norwegian Sea (Norwegian: Norskehavet) is a marginal sea in the Arctic Ocean, northwest of Norway between the North Sea and the Greenland Sea, adjoining the Barents Sea to the northeast. In the southwest, it is separated from the Atlantic Ocean by a submarine ridge running between Iceland and the Faroe Islands. To the north, the Jan Mayen Ridge separates it from the Greenland Sea. Unlike many other seas, most of the bottom of the Norwegian Sea is not part of a continental shelf and therefore lies at a great depth of about two kilometres on average. Rich deposits of oil and natural gas are found under the sea bottom and are being explored commercially, in the areas with sea depths of up to about one kilometre. The coastal zones are rich in fish that visit the Norwegian Sea from the North Atlantic or from the Barents Sea (cod) for spawning. The warm North Atlantic Current ensures relatively stable and high water temperatures, so that unlike the Arctic seas, the Norwegian Sea is ice-free throughout the year. Recent research has concluded that the large volume of water in the Norwegian Sea with its large heat absorption capacity is more important as a source of Norway's mild winters than the Gulf Stream and its extensions.
Views: 12 wikipedia tts
Barentshavet - en skattekiste!
 
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The film is about Barentshavet and 5 of the fish who live there: cod, haddock, saithe, herring and capelin. They are esssential to the ecosystem in the sea and an important part of the norwegian export industry. Produced by Klipp og Lim. Commissioned by The Norwegian Directorate for Nature Management and The Directorate of Fisheries.
Views: 614 klippoglim
Thin ice studies in the Arctic: N-ICE2015
 
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The research vessel Lance was frozen into the Arctic ice pack in the midst of the polar night in January 2015, under the auspices of Norwegian Polar Institute led project N-ICE2015 to study the effects and feedbacks of the thinning of Arctic sea ice. For 6 months the ship will serve as platform for about a hundred scientists from more than ten nations studying the interaction of the atmosphere, ice, ocean and marine ecosystem, to help us understand future changes better.
Views: 3197 NorskPolarinstitutt
Hein Rune Skjoldal - WGIBAR for the Barents Sea and WGINOR for the Norwegian Sea LME
 
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Recording from the Arctic Council conference: Ecosystem Approach to Management: Status of Implementation in the Arctic (August, 2016).
Views: 9 PAME Secretariat
Gro van der Meeren - The Norwegian EA management plan for the Barents Sea
 
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Recording from the Arctic Council conference: Ecosystem Approach to Management: Status of Implementation in the Arctic (August, 2016).
Views: 7 PAME Secretariat
ARCTOS international network for Arctic ecology
 
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The ARCTOS research network (www.arctosresearch.net) was established in 2002 after the initiative from scientists at The Norwegian College of Fishery Science/University of Tromsø (UiT), the Norwegian Polar Institute, UNIS (The University centre at Svalbard) and Akvaplan-niva. Later, scientists from the Institute of Geology (UiT), the Institute of Marine Research and Bodø University College have joined, as well as scientists in several other institutions in Norway. ARCTOS is organized with a secretariat at UiT, and with part of its administrative activities localized at UNIS, Akvaplan-niva and IMR. The ARCTOS scientists conduct science over a broad range of marine ecology topics in the Barents Sea and around Svalbard, and in most of the northern waters. Several important institutions in Russia, North America and the EU are collaborating within the frame of ARCTOS, giving this research a pan-Arctic perspective. Research on the Norwegian side is financed through the Norwegian Research Council, EU-programmes, own institutional funding and support from the petroleum industry (StatoilHydro, ConocoPhillips, Eni and Total). ARCTOS is organised as a resesarch project based at the University of Tromsø. The video was produced by Francoise Greenacre.
Views: 474 ArcticFrontiers
RIMFROST KRILL and research in the Antarctic ecosystem
 
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Dr. Georg Skaret works for the Institute of Marine Research (IMR) in Norway. Dr. Skaret was interviewed about his work when Norwegian, British and Chinese scientists were last on-board Olympic Seafood's vessel, the Juvel, in the beginning of the krill season 2011/12. He and his colleagues closely study samples of krill to get biological data, for instance measuring the length of the krill. They also use acoustics to locate krill swarms, study their density and movements as well provide estimates of how much krill there are in particular areas.
Views: 1473 Rimfrost Krill
Intervju med Reidar Toresen
 
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Intervju med Reidar Toresen angående norske kaldtvannskorallrev. Bergen, 15. mars, 2009. --------------------------------------- Research Director at the Norwegian Institute for Marine Research, mr. Reidar Toresen, explains the scientific advice to keep key areas of the Norwegian Sea, including the Lofoten islands, off limits for petroleum exploration: The IMR has been very clear in our advice that oil drilling should not be allowed on the spawning grounds on the shelf bordering the Norwegian Sea. Petroleum activities should not be allowed in the Lofoten and Vesterålen area, since these are central areas for the cod, or on Møre, since this is the central spawning ground for the Atlanto-scandic spring spawning herring. We have also advised to limit petroleum activity also elsewhere on the shelf, since this is an important larvae-drift area throughout the spring period each year. Larvae and eggs are most vulnerable for oil pollution, explains Mr Toresen.
Views: 237 gpnorge
glimpse of norway
 
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a journey through norway and its amazing landscapes.
Views: 2314 tsorgjer
Norway's Salmon Farming Crisis | The Fish on My Plate | FRONTLINE
 
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In Alaska's Vasso river, there are more escaped farmed fish than there are wild salmon -- and they're carrying sea lice. Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1BycsJW Watch an excerpt from "The Fish on My Plate" about Norway's salmon crisis. Author and fisherman Paul Greenberg spent a year traveling the world and eating seafood for breakfast, lunch and dinner in an attempt to find out what sort of fish is both good for him -- and good for the planet. "The Fish on My Plate" premieres Tues. April 25th from 10 p.m. EST / 9 p.m. CST on PBS and online: http://to.pbs.org/2nezen3 Twitter: https://twitter.com/frontlinepbs Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frontline Google+: https://plus.google.com/+frontline/posts FRONTLINE is streaming more than 200 documentaries online, for free, here: http://to.pbs.org/hxRvQP FRONTLINE is made possible by PBS and CPB. Major support is provided by The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. Additional support is provided by Ford Foundation, the Park Foundation, the John and Helen Glessner Family Trust, the Wyncote Foundation and Jon and Jo Ann Hagler on behalf of the Jon L. Hagler Foundation.
Norwegian Coral Reefs Threatened
 
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Beneath the cold waters of the Norwegian Sea lies one of our planets last hidden treasures. Cold water coral reefs. Upto 50 percent of these reefs have already been destroyed by exploitative fishing practices. Now it's upto the Norwegian government to halt the destruction and create a series of Marine Reserves. SIgn the petition to help protect these unique habitats. http://www.greenpeace.org/norway/campaigns/hav/helhetlig-plan-for-norskehavet
Views: 8720 Greenpeace Danmark
NCL GEM Docking in SAGUENAY (La Baie) l CRUISE VLOG l Ep. 9
 
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It's a new day which means we are in Saguenay (La Baie) today! OMG, the sail in is AMAZING!! If the weather is nice, make sure to be out on deck when sailing into this port because it can be pretty foggy when leaving. Today, we are doing a shore excursion through Norwegian Cruise Line, though this exact tour is offered through MOST other cruise lines! It is called, "EASY WALK AT SAGUENAY NATIONAL PARK" and here is the tour description from NCL's website: “For those that prefer to enjoy the beauty and tranquility of Saguenay National Park at a leisurely pace, this tour is for you! From the pier in La Baie, you’ll enjoy a 60-minute scenic drive to Parc National du Saguenay Interpretation Center. Following your introduction to the park, you’ll join your guide for an easy one-hour stroll along the Meandres des Falaises trail during your stroll you will learn about the creation and characteristics of the Fjord. Owing its magnificent geography to a 15-billion ton meteorite that fell on earth 350 million years ago you’ll learn the answers to such question as: What’s a Fjord? How was it shaped? Why are the waters of the Saguenay River so dark and salted? Are these sand dunes or marine terraces? What species can be regularly observed in the Park? What are the habits of the St Lawrence’s beluga? You’ll have time on your own to fully explore the Interpretation Centre as it reveals the hidden mysteries of this exceptional ecosystem or shop in the trendy gift shop.” As always, make sure to watch in HD for the best video quality! Hope you enjoy! :) #NorwegianGem #Saguenay #CruiseVlog To see more videos, please: like, share, comment and subscribe! Norwegian Gem Cruise Vlogs Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLL5x1PdrKflRB6S8FToOnp0j8Rt8yVLfl Norwegian Bliss Panama Canal Cruise Vlogs: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLL5x1PdrKflQxPKFqDFHo3G4LfoK8zfkh Norwegian Sun Cuba Cruise Vlogs: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLL5x1PdrKflTM2Kr8KGf5g5ogqPucyFrO Norwegian Breakaway Transatlantic Cruise Vlogs: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLL5x1PdrKflRDkA8OdlAEjhNjbl5jPWj9 Carnival Inspiration Cruise Vlogs: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLL5x1PdrKflSPCXXilBq_nEcR7MJlyrsg Noordam Alaska Cruise Vlogs: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLL5x1PdrKflQhhwuU7mFr18bS0jXZu5Nr Royal Princess Mediterranean Cruise Vlogs: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLL5x1PdrKflRnvHPindDJZdW1rGpc5CgW Website: https://scottsingercruises.com/ Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1762684044006390/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/scottsingercruises/?hl=en Alaska/Canada & New England Group Cruises Info: https://scottsingercruises.com/group-cruises Scott Singer Cruises Merchandise: https://scottsingercruises.com/shop Email: [email protected]
Views: 1849 Scott Singer Cruises
The Problem with Farmed Salmon | Global 3000
 
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Aquaculture-grown fish and seafood is becoming increasingly common. Worldwide, more fish than cattle are farmed. But the booming fish industry is causing environmental problems. Medications, pesticides and parasites are escaping from open-water farms and contaminating the ecosystem. Scientists and environmental activists are sounding the alarm for the unique, UNESCO-protected ecosystem of Vancouver Island, which contains one of the world largest concentrations of wild salmon. Report by Michael Altenhenne Global 3000 home page: http://www.dw.de/program/global-3000/s-11487-9798
Views: 60102 DW News
EU-MERCES webinar - Private finance in marine ecosystem restoration
 
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The webinar will focus on two important projects: Identifying private financing mechanisms for marine ecosystem restoration. Rolf Groeneveld, Wageningen University, Environmental Economics and Natural Resources Group. Traditionally governments have been the dominant source of finance of ecosystem restoration, including marine ecosystems. Recent developments, however, have seen the growth of private sources of finance for restoration and conservation of biodiversity. In this webinar I will explain the major sources of such private finance, the institutional and biophysical obstacles to such finance, and the mechanisms that have been developed to overcome these obstacles. Private financing potentials for marine ecosystem restoration: a kelp-urchin case in Northern Norway Wenting Chen, Norwegian Institute for Water Research Urchin barrens have dominated the Northern coast of Norway in the last forty years. As a main predator for kelp forest, overpopulation of sea urchins are the main reason of disappearance of kelp forest. There have been various initiatives from private industry to make use of sea urchins at the same time to restore kelp forest in the region. In the webinar, I will discuss private financing potentials for kelp forest restoration in Northern Norway and the experience we had from collaborating with industry.
Views: 109 GRID-Arendal
Glass Dome Eco House In The Arctic Circle
 
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SUBSCRIBE to the Barcroft network: http://bit.ly/Oc61Hj A NORWEGIAN family have built a seven metre glass dome around their off-grid house in the Arctic Circle. Benjamin and Ingrid Hjertefolger have spent £340,000 constructing their dream home, which is made entirely from all-natural materials such as sand and straw - in order to live sustainably. Located on Sandhorney Island, north Norway, the 7.5 metre high dome is made up of 360 glass panels and shields the entire house with a diameter of 15 metres allowing the family to grow their own fruit and vegetables inside. The project started back in 2012 and one and a half years later, Benjamin, Ingrid and their four children, Julia, 11, Gabriel, nine, Aron, six and Alvin 10 months, moved into their unique abode. Videographer / director: Benjamin Hjertefolger Producer: Danny Baggott, Ellie Winstanley Editor: Joshua Douglas Barcroft TV: https://www.youtube.com/user/barcroftmedia/featured Barcroft Cars: https://www.youtube.com/user/BarcroftCars/featured Bear Grylls Adventure: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzcUNwS7mypzPhW4gsjO7og/featured For more of the amazing side of life: For the full story, visit BARCROFT.TV: http://www.barcroft.tv/ Like BARCROFT TV on Facebook: https://www.Facebook.com/BarcroftTV Follow @Barcroft_TV on Twitter: https://www.Twitter.com/Barcroft_TV Check out more videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/barcroftmedia/videos
Views: 436582 Barcroft TV
Lance Expedition Norwegian Young Sea Ice Cruise
 
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A 2015 research cruise aboard the Polar Research Vessel Lance to understand the effects of the new thin, first year, sea ice regime in the Arctic on energy flux, ice dynamics and the ice associated ecosystem, and local and global climate. Thank you to the Norwegian Polar Institute and Oystein Mikelborg for the video!
Views: 145 UNOLS Office
Arne Naess and the Deep Ecology Movement (short version)
 
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The Call of the Mountain: Arne Naess and the Deep Ecology Movement : Director: Jan van Boeckel | Producer: Karin van der Molen/Pat van Boeckel Genre: Documentary | Produced In: 1997 | Story Teller's Country: Netherlands Tags: Ecology, Environment, Global, Spiritual Awareness Full documentary: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wf3cXTAqS2M Dailymotion: http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x8meah_arne-naess_creation ~ Transcript of the film The full transcript of the interview with philosopher Arne Naess, that was made for the documentary film The Call of the Mountain is available here: http://www.naturearteducation.org/R/Interviews/Naess1.htm Interview: Jan van Boeckel © ReRun Producties, 1997 Blokzijlerdijk 4, 8373 EK Blankenham, The Netherlands E-mail: welcome(at)rerunproducties.nl www.rerunproducties.nl ~ Synopsis: On 1500 metres above sea level, on the slope of the mountain Hallingskarvet, stands "Tvergastein', the cabin of Norwegian philosopher Arne Naess. In his life he has spent nearly 12 years in this hut, where he wrote several books and essays on philosophy and ecology. In this film, Naess tells about the concept of 'deep ecology', which was first introduced by him in 1973. One of the basic tenets of deep ecology is that nature has a value in itself, apart from its possible use value to humans. Next to being a famous mountaineer, Naess has been a longtime activist in the environmental movement. He gives an inspiring account of his participation in blockades to prevent the Alta river in northern Norway (the area of the Sami, an indigenous people) from being dammed. With contributions by Helena Norberg-Hodge, Vandana Shiva, Bill Devall, George Sessions and Harold Glasser. Request DVD: You may purchase the DVD of this film directly from this StoryTeller/Producer. Please visit: http://www.rerunproducties.nl/ Or contribute: http://www.cultureunplugged.com/documentary/watch-online/play/11828/The-Call-of-the-Mountain--Arne-Naess-and-the-Deep-Ecology-Movement ~ Arne Næss (27 January 1912 – 12 January 2009) was a Norwegian philosopher who coined the term deep ecology and was an important intellectual and inspirational figure within the environmental movement of the late twentieth century. In 1939, Næss was the youngest person to be appointed full professor at the University of Oslo and the only professor of philosophy in the country at the time. He was a noted mountaineer, who in 1950 led the expedition that made the first ascent of Tirich Mir(7,708 m). The Tvergastein hut in the Hallingskarvet massif played an important role in Ecosophy T, as "T" is said to represent his mountain hut Tvergastein. More: Arne Næss (Google+): https://plus.google.com/u/0/112673322472884421570/posts ~ This video is a part of the copy from "rerunproducties", DailyMotion: http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x8meah_arne-naess_creation ~
AKVA Animation - Complete Aquaculture Supplier
 
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Animation showing complete solutions from both land and sea based aquaculture.
Views: 2058 AKVA group
Modeling with multiple currencies - Ecological Stoichiometry
 
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A presentation by Tom Andersen, University of Oslo, on the PhD course: Modeling to study the Baltic Sea ecosystem - possibilities and challenges To BEAMs homepage: http://www.smf.su.se/beam
Views: 318 SUBalticSeaCentre
The physical oceanography of the Norwegian, Icelandic,Irminger and Labrador Seas
 
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About two thirds into the expedition, oceanographer Ken Drinkwater at the Institute of Marine Research discusses the physical oceanography of the oceans covered in the Norwegian Euro-Basin cruise in May and June 2013.
Views: 389 havforskningen
MSEAS 2016 Torgeir Edvardsen, OECD, Norway
 
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Introductory talk from Alida Bundy at MSEAS 2016 Understanding marine socio-ecological systems: including the human dimension in Integrated Ecosystem Assessments 30 May - 3 June 2016 Brest, France
whaling - science from the sea
 
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Whaling has taken a huge toll on the whale ecosystem over the past 150 years. Since the 1986 moratorium on all commercial whaling, only Japan, Norway, Greenland and Iceland now harvest whales, for "scientific" purposes, but critics say that minimal scientific benefit is gained. This video investigates the scientific benefit of whaling. From the Sydney Morning Herald: International Court of Justice upholds Australia's bid to ban Japanese whaling in Antarctica The International Court of Justice has upheld Australia's bid to ban Japan's Antarctic whaling program. ICJ president Peter Tomka said the court concluded the scientific permits granted by Japan for its whaling program were not scientific research as defined under International Whaling Commission rules. Mr Tomka said in The Hague that the court was persuaded that Japan had conducted a program for logistical and political considerations, rather than scientific research. The court unanimously found it had jurisdiction to hear the case, and by 12 votes to four found that special permits granted by Japan in connection with the program, JARPA II, did not fall within the IWC convention. It therefore ordered that Japan revoke any scientific permit under JARPA II and refrain from granting any further permits. Prominent Australians welcomed the ICJ's decision. Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/environment/whale-watch/international-court-of-justice-upholds-australias-bid-to-ban-japanese-whaling-in-antarctica-20140331-35ude.html#ixzz2xXa8KGl0
Views: 676 dangerouslytalented
Marine birds are in trouble in the North-East Atlantic
 
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Marine birds are valuable indicators of ecosystem condition. OSPAR assesses the abundance and breeding success of marine birds. In the Norwegian Arctic, the Greater North Sea and the Celtic Seas, there has been a considerable drop in abundance compared to the levels observed 25 years ago, for more than a quarter of the marine bird species assessed. Frequent and widespread breeding failure has been observed for many species, especially those feeding on small fish in the surface waters of the Greater North Sea and Celtic Seas. Prey availability is likely to be driven by ecosystem-specific changes, possibly impacted by commercial fisheries and climate change. In the last OSPAR Quality Status Report (QSR 2010), OSPAR highlighted the occurrence of breeding failure in parts of the Greater North Sea and the Arctic, and stressed the need for research into links between environmental factors and the long-term health of marine bird populations.
Views: 2 OSPAR Commission
Svalbard - Fishy Business
 
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The Arctic is warming at a rate of almost twice the global average and is one of the main drivers behind dramatic melting in the Arctic. Sea ice loss in the northern Barents Sea around Svalbard is turning these waters into new hunting grounds for industrial fishing fleets. With them comes the threats of habitat degradation and bycatch, potentially wiping out marine life that has inhabited these waters for centuries and putting this whole fragile ecosystem at risk. According to the Norwegian Institute of Marine Research, bottom trawling has damaged 30-50% of Norway’s coral reefs.
Views: 284 Christian Åslund
Lagoons under the microscope - futuris
 
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http://www.euronews.com/ At the Ria de Aveiro Lagoon in Portugal the day starts early for European scientists as they set out to gather samples. The lagoon offers a rich but fragile 75 square kilometre ecosystem of wetlands, seagrasses and salt marshes used as nursery areas for bivalves, crustaceans, fish and birds. It is a natural treasure that, as with other European coastal lagoons, is facing huge threats. "Among the most common problems we find here is the high presence of nutrients in the water. These nutrients favour the bloom of green algae. The green algae absorb oxygen from the water, and eventually the whole aquatic ecosystem can lose its environmental health and quality. These last years we have also found a new trend of pollutants, chemical compounds from drugs and other nanoparticles, that can also challenge the quality of the environment around," explained Ana Lillebø a biologist and project coordinator at the University of Aveiro/Lagoons. Climate change could also pose dangerous threats. It could alter volumes of water in the lagoon, the temperature and acidity, which could then weaken further an already delicate ecosystem. Researchers want to know how key vegetable and animal species in the lagoon's trophic chain would react to sudden changes in their ecosystems. "We can predict the future climate change patterns with models. And if we match those models with our biological research, we can foresee how these crucial species will evolve over time; if they will increase, decrease or if they will simply disappear from the lagoon's ecosystems," said Arnaldo Marín Atucha an ecologist at the University of Murcia This scientific effort, part of a European Union research project, includes detailed field work in four coastal lagoons around Europe, each with different realities and challenges but with a common urgency in the need to protect them. Biological data is matched with sophisticated computer modelling. Researchers try to predict using interactive maps how climate change-induced alterations, but also pressure from tourism, industry or agricultural land use, will affect the lagoons' health and sustainability. Per Stalnacke is a water quality expert at the Norwegian Institute for Agricultural and Environmental Research and pointed out: "Of course there is a large uncertainty. But we have to remember that we are collecting the best available scientific knowledge into these computer models. So this is not science fiction". The research also involves dealing with the local population. Scientists organise focus groups with hunters and fishermen to provide scientific information and receive factual data and meaningful feedback on the lagoon's real potential and also its main weaknesses. "We provide them with maps basically. And we asked them to use dots and colours to show us on those maps which areas of the lagoons they feel are developing well and which areas they feel are being threatened. So besides getting information about which issues there are at stake, we also get the geographic location of them," explained Geoffrey D. Gooch, Professor of Water & Environmental Policy at the University of Dundee. It is a three year research effort that scientists, hunters and fishermen hope will help to preserve some quite unique natural ecosystems. A point underlined by Boaventura Bastos Marrafa, President of the Avanca Hunting & Fishing Association. "We have the sea, then the sea inlet, then the lagoon. And then, nothing else except lots of motorways. There is no more space for wildlife. So all hunting friendly-spots around this area are in the lagoon. That is why we, hunters, also have to fight to protect it, and preserve the natural balance of these ecosystems." Arnaldo Marín Atucha, an ecologist at the University of Murcia concluded: "Each lagoon is unique. If we lose this natural heritage, we will also lose a bit of our own identity". For more information go to: "https://www. lagoons.web.ua.pt":https://www. lagoons.web.ua.pt Find us on: Youtube http://bit.ly/zr3upY Facebook http://www.facebook.com/euronews.fans Twitter http://twitter.com/euronews
Doug Aitken installs geodesic pavilions under the sea
 
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This captioned movie shows an underwater installation by artist Doug Aitken, in which three mirrored geodesic sculptures were anchored to the seabed at different depths near Catalina Island in California. Read more on Dezeen: https://www.dezeen.com/?p=1174819 WATCH NEXT: Erika Marthins uses edible robotics to create sensory desserts - https://youtu.be/i8Jja31-0No Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh Like Dezeen on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dezeen/ Follow Dezeen on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dezeen/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dezeen/ Check out our Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/dezeen/
Views: 8732 Dezeen
Catamaran Coral Reef Snorkel
 
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http://www.ncl.com/excursions/search?Ntt=WRF52 Step aboard a comfortable and stable catamaran for a trip to the northernmost coral reef in the world. Relax on deck and enjoy complimentary soft drinks while the crew provides informative commentary on the island and the fascinating undersea ecosystem. After an approximate 45 minute cruise you will find yourself moored in a magical deep blue oasis, bordered by fringe reef on nearly all sides. Here, you will be given a mask, snorkel, fins, buoyancy vest and instruction on how you may best enjoy the undersea paradise. Immerse yourself in crystal clear waters under the watchful eye of your instructors and explore the great expanses of pristine reef. After snorkeling, the sails will be hoisted and you can enjoy a relaxing sail home with a legendary, complimentary Rum Swizzle. A cash bar is also available. Note: Participants must be at least 21 years of age to consume alcohol. A valid photo I.D. is required. Cash bar available onboard. Guests must be good swimmers and in good physical condition. Wear your swimsuit bring a towel and sunscreen. Tour operator reserves the right to substitute an inshore snorkel location in the event of inclement weather conditions https://www.ncl.com/cruise-destinations/caribbean-cruises
Views: 26889 Norwegian Cruise Line
King Crab Encroachment Could Threaten Antarctic Ecosystems
 
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An NSF-funded research team lead by the Florida Institute of Technology or FIT, has documented for the first time, a population of King Crabs that has migrated to shallower, warming seas off the Antarctic Peninsula. The team believes this predator could potentially threaten an Antarctic ecosystem that has been crab free for millions of years. NSF release: http://1.usa.gov/1YLYrUQ
A message for Cermaq Part 2
 
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This film is a message for the fish farming company- Mainstream, a subsidiary of the Norwegian multinational company Cermaq, produced in order to educate the shareholders about the impacts their company is having in BC to local tourism operators, fishermen, first nations and the ecosystem produced by Twyla Roscovich for more films visit www.callingfromthecoast.com
Views: 3690 Twyla Roscovich
Norwegian Coral Reefs Threatened
 
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Beneath the cold waters of the Norwegian Sea lies one of our planets last hidden treasures. Cold water coral reefs. Upto 50 percent of these reefs have already been destroyed by exploitative fishing practices. Now it's upto the Norwegian government to halt the destruction and create a series of Marine Reserves. http://www.greenpeace.org/marine-reserves-now
Views: 1011 Greenpeace Danmark
How Does Mercury Get Into Fish?
 
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Doctors warn against eating too much fish because of the risk of ingesting mercury, but how does mercury get into fish in the first place? How Does Mercury Get Into Fish? http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-does-mercury-get-into/ “Mercury in the fish we like to eat is a big problem in the United States and increasingly around the world. Mercury itself is a naturally occurring element that is present throughout the environment and in plants and animals.“ Synthetic coral could remove toxic heavy metals from the ocean http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2015-07/e-scc072315.php “A new material that mimics coral could help remove toxic heavy metals like mercury from the ocean, according to a new study published in the Journal of Colloid and Interface Science.” Mercury Levels in Commercial Fish and Shellfish http://www.fda.gov/food/foodborneillnesscontaminants/metals/ucm115644.htm ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More DNews on TestTube http://testtube.com/dnews Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez Julia Wilde on Twitter https://twitter.com/julia_sci DNews on Facebook https://facebook.com/DiscoveryNews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com Download the TestTube App: http://testu.be/1ndmmMq
Views: 129499 Seeker
► Ice Race - Exploitation - THE END of FISHING? (FULL Documentary)
 
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What are the challenges being faced by one of the world’s most important larders, the Artic, now that the ice is melting? The race to exploit vast natural resources has commenced in one of the world’s most important larders. The earth’s most vulnerable ecosystem is under threat from dying fish, oil spills and global warming. As the ice melts many people are being tempted to engage in predatory activities in the Arctic. An ocean from which the fish have previously disappeared - will this occur again? In the programme entitled “Predatory Activities” you will hear that climate change and increased petroleum activities in the future would change current hunting and fishing patterns. This would create new tension in the fragile administration of the northern areas. What challenges are we actually facing and how would they affect current fishing activities? Will the nations involved manage to cooperate? Previous predatory activities in the Arctic have left their mark for all eternity, with whales and fish being hunted to extinction simply by using basic hunting methods. The ice is now melting. High-tech trawlers, global oil companies and giant supertankers are all heading for the north. The race has started in earnest. However, at the same time our knowledge is better. Will we manage to look after this vulnerable area this time, or will the melting ice cause us to engage in new predatory activities with unexpected consequences?
Views: 41707 Free Documentary
Haakon Hop: Importance of Russian data
 
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Haakon Hop of the Norwegian Polar Institute explains changes in trophic levels in Arctic species, as part of involvement in a new marine report. The State of the Arctic Marine Biodiversity Report (SAMBR) is a synthesis of the state of knowledge about biodiversity in Arctic marine ecosystems, detectable changes, and important gaps in our ability to assess state and trends in biodiversity across six focal ecosystem components (FECs): marine mammals, seabirds, fishes, benthos, plankton, sea ice biota. The SAMBR, is a product of the Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Program (CBMP) of the Arctic Council’s Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF) Working Group. For more information: www.arcticbiodiversity.is/marine
Norwegian salmon farming destroys wild salmon in BC Canada
 
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Norwegian salmon farms harming BC’s environment The province of British Columbia, on the Pacific coast of Canada, is powered by wild salmon. The relatively young post-glacial soils are lacking in nutrients necessary for plant growth, such as nitrogen. Yet the coastal temperate rain forests of BC grow globally famous ancient Western Red Cedars, and Sitka Spruce trees of monumental proportions. Scientists discovered relatively recently that the missing nitrogen is transported from the ocean up rivers (sometimes hundreds of kilometres) by five species of wild Pacific salmon, which return to their natal streams to spawn and die. Animals such as bears, wolves and eagles then spread the nitrogen throughout the ecosystem. Everything on the coast, from the wildlife to the economy, from the rain forests to indigenous cultures, is dependent on the health of the wild salmon. Yet wild salmon are in serious decline, with runs where I live returning in the tens, rather than tens of thousands. The BC salmon farming industry is over 90% owned by Norwegian companies. Industry practices have been exported from Norway to Canada. But when we look back to Norway, we see an industry plagued with problems such as sea lice outbreaks, viruses, and escaped farmed fish. The situation in Norway provides a roadmap to where British Columbia may be headed, unless changes are made soon. Norway is currently experiencing record levels of sea lice infestations. Desperate attempts to control these critters are failing. Because sea lice are crustaceans, chemicals which kill them harm other crustaceans as well. Collateral damage in the war against sea lice includes shrimp, prawns, and crabs. The situation in Norway has gotten so out of hand that the government recently shut down nearly an entire district in order to prevent further damage to the environment. Prawn and shrimp fishermen are reporting dramatic declines in catch levels. Dan Lewis is Executive Director of ClayoquotAction.org.
Krill fishing threatens Antarctic ecosystem, warn conservationists | Al Jazeera English
 
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Conservationists are warning that the industrial fishing of krill in Antarctica is threatening the future of its ecosystem. The tiny crustaceans are a source of food for whales, penguins and seals. Al Jazeera's Nick Clark reports in the final part of his series from Antarctica. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/
Views: 4253 Al Jazeera English
Save The Southern Resident Killer Whales
 
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Link to our Kickstarter here: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/480204240/coextinction?utm_source=YT "Coextinction" is an innovative, ten episode documentary series that travels to Canada’s wild and beautiful West Coast, capturing an intimate and provoking story of extraordinary people fighting to save an extraordinary species. In this film, we discover the Salish Sea’s ecosystem and understand how to protect the Southern Resident Killer Whales. From the land to the sea and through devoted experts and wildlife activists, we understand that “Coextinction” isn’t just about the Southern Resident Killer Whales, it’s about the Chinook salmon, and ultimately, it’s about our actions. www.coextinctionfilm.com @coextinctionfilm #wearetheorca Footage from: Nicholas Castel Elena Jean One Species Tasli Shaw Gabriel Swift NOAA KGW8 News NBC CTV Vancouver Vancouver Aquarium Global News BC Timescolonist Canada C3 Expedition Video Blocks Film Supply Victoria Marine Science Association Vancouver Sun Edited by Nicholas Castel Coming soon.
Views: 3570 Coextinction Film
Enjoy little bit of Norway
 
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Norway comprises the western part of Scandinavia in Northern Europe. The rugged coastline, broken by huge fjords and thousands of islands, stretches 25,000 kilometres (16,000 mi) and 83,000 kilometres (52,000 mi) including fjords and islands. Norway shares a 1,619-kilometre (1,006 mi) land border with Sweden, 727 kilometres (452 mi) with Finland and 196 kilometres (122 mi) with Russia at the east. To the north, west and south, Norway is bordered by the Barents Sea, the Norwegian Sea, the North Sea and Skagerrak.[46] Norwegian lowland landscape near the Gaulosen branch of Trondheimsfjord Reine in Lofoten, Northern Norway At 385,252 square kilometres (148,747 sq mi) (including Svalbard and Jan Mayen), (and 323,802 square kilometres (125,021 sq mi) without) much of the country is dominated by mountainous or high terrain, with a great variety of natural features caused by prehistoric glaciers and varied topography. The most noticeable of these are the fjords: deep grooves cut into the land flooded by the sea following the end of the Ice Age. The longest is Sognefjorden at 204 kilometres (127 mi). Sognefjorden is the world's second deepest fjord, and the world's longest. Hornindalsvatnet is the deepest lake in all Europe.[47] Frozen ground all year can be found in the higher mountain areas and in the interior of Finnmark county. Numerous glaciers are found in Norway. Norway lies between latitudes 57° and 81° N, and longitudes 4° and 32° E. The land is mostly made of hard granite and gneiss rock, but slate, sandstone and limestone are also common, and the lowest elevations contain marine deposits. Because of the Gulf Stream and prevailing westerlies, Norway experiences higher temperatures and more precipitation than expected at such northern latitudes, especially along the coast. The mainland experiences four distinct seasons, with colder winters and less precipitation inland. The northernmost part has a mostly maritime Subarctic climate, while Svalbard has an Arctic tundra climate. Because of the large latitudinal range of the country and the varied topography and climate, Norway has a larger number of different habitats than almost any other European country. There are approximately 60,000 species in Norway and adjacent waters (excluding bacteria and virus). The Norwegian Shelf large marine ecosystem is considered highly productive.[48]
Views: 332 Vaidas Prucinskas
Evolution of marine phytoplankton size
 
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Y-axis = Depth X-axis = Size structure of the phytoplankton populations Color gradient = Abundance of a specific cell-size This video illustrates how, through evolutionary processes, diversity (here in size) may emerge from a single group of identical individuals. The particular ecosystem modelled here is a simple phytoplankton community in a modelled corner of the ocean (a water-column somewhere in the Norwegian sea). These tiny organisms use light and inorganic nutrient as fuel to generate their organic matter, or in other words, life. By doing so they produce the atmospheric oxygen without which we could not breathe. They are also food for other organisms that cannot perform photosynthesis: zooplankton, eaten by fishes, eaten by... us. These beings are therefore of a great importance, and their interaction with their environment (and therefore with us) greatly depends on how diverse they are. The question of how this diversity emerges and is maintained is thus not anodyne. In this particular scenario, it is the pressure applied on the phytoplankton population by its direct consumer, the zooplankton, that, during the ~ 100 years of simulation, acts as a diversifying force.
SEASPIRACY - What You Should Know About Fish & The Ocean
 
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SEASPIRACY: What You Should Know About Fish, The Ocean, and More! By Friendly Activist The Friendly Activist YouTube https://www.youtube.com/user/TheFriendlyActivist EDUCATIONAL VEGAN CONTENT https://www.patreon.com/thefriendlyactivist?ty=h The Friendly Activist Website http://www.thefriendlyactivist.com/ **World Peace YouTube Channel is Vegan for Life** http://www.vegandoshadiet.com/
Views: 40677 World Peace

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